Thursday, September 26, 2019

Bris During the Ten Days of Repentance

The book "Otzar HaBris" (Yossele Weisberg) has a section of halakhot surrounding what is done differently on noted days of the Jewish calendar.

With respect to a bris during the Aseres Y'mei Teshuvah, he shares the following insights:

1. If the father of the baby, the sandak for the bris, or the mohel are present at a Shacharis, tachanun will be skipped. However, "Avinu Malkeinu" - an additional prayer recited between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, will be recited. 

2. Those who have the custom to fast during the 10 days may eat at the "seudat mitzvah" of the bris, and they do not need to do/say hatarat neder for their custom to fast. The exception would be if the person specifically made a vow at Mincha the previous day - not knowing he would be at a bris - for that vow, hatarat neder would be necessary.


Next up will be a bris on Yom Kippur

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Bris on Tzom Gedaliah

The book "Otzar HaBris" (Yossele Weisberg) has a section of halakhot surrounding what is done differently on noted days of the Jewish calendar.

With respect to a bris on Tzom Gedaliah, he shares the following insights:

1. The prayers are the same for the fast day - saying Selichos and Viduy.
2. However, Tachanun is not recited during Shacharis (it is recited as part of Selichos)
3. We say Kel Erekh Apayim and Lamnatzeach
4. When we say the blessing on the wine, we give some of it to the baby to drink.
5. If the fast day is pushed off to Sunday (because the 3rd of Tishrei fell on Shabbos), then the mohel, sandak or baby's father may drink, as none of them (the "baalet bris") are required to fast
6. Some have the custom to give the baby the name "Gedaliah," while others felt this should not be done.

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Bris on Rosh Hashana

The book "Otzar HaBris" (Yossele Weisberg) has a section of halakhot surrounding what is done differently on noted days of the Jewish calendar.

With respect to a bris on  Rosh Hashana, he shares the following insights:

1. If the bris will be taking place in the synagogue, the Rosh Hashana bris should ideally take place after Torah reading, before Shofar blowing. It should certainly not take place at the end of Tefillah.
2. If the bris will be in a home, it could take place after prayer services are over. If the home is close to the synagogue, and there's a way for the bris to take place at the proper time (see #1) without causing a delay in the services, then it should be done. (If there is an appeal or the rabbi's sermon, and the mohel can work quickly to not miss shofar blowing, then I suppose this is possible - but there shouldn't be a mass exodus - only those needed for the ceremony)
3. If it is the Sabbath, since there will not be Shofar blowing, the bris will take place after the Torah is returned to the Ark, before the Chazzan for Mussaf begins his prayer before Mussaf. (Some say it should take place at the same time as it would during a weekday Rosh Hashana day, after Torah reading and before Ashrei)
4. If the bris will cause the mohel to miss Shofar blowing, some say it is OK for him to miss out on Shofar blowing for the sake of the mitzvah of bris. Others say this only applies to a father who is also a trained mohel. Otherwise, the mohel should not be missing out on hearing the Shofar.
5. There is a custom to give the name Yitzchak to a child who is either circumcised on Rosh Hashana or who is born on Rosh Hashana.
6. Some say to not make a celebratory Bris meal on Rosh Hashana. (In the footnote he mentions a concern that such a celebration might take away from the more serious nature of the day)
7. Those who fast on Rosh Hashana (not a common practice) - both opinions exist regarding whether to eat. You may not eat, while some are lenient saying you may eat (welcome to Judaism!)
8. A child who is born at dusk a week before either the first or second day of Rosh Hashana will eb circumcised the day after Rosh Hashana (on Tzom Gedaliah). Of course if that day is Shabbos, the bris will be pushed off (as will be Tzom Gedaliah) to Sunday.


Next up, a bris on Tzom Gedaliah

Monday, September 16, 2019

Bris on Erev Rosh Hashana

The book "Otzar HaBris" (Yossele Weisberg) has a section of halakhot surrounding what is done differently on noted days of the Jewish calendar.

With respect to a bris on the day before Rosh Hashana, he shares the following insight - which is essentially the same as the first rule he shared regarding a Rosh Chodesh bris. 

Those who have the custom to fast on Erev Rosh Hashana may participate in the Bris celebratory meal.

Next up, a bris on Rosh Hashana.

Sunday, September 15, 2019

Bris on Rosh Chodesh

The book "Otzar HaBris" (Yossele Weisberg) has a section of halakhot surrounding what is done differently on noted days of the Jewish calendar.

With respect to Rosh Chodesh, he shares two points:

1. Someone who fasts on Erev Rosh Chodesh (the day before Rosh Chodesh, sometimes called Yom Kippur Katan) may eat at a Bris meal, according to some opinions.

2. At the meal for a bris which takes place on Rosh Chodesh, an additional food item should be added to the menu, specifically in honor of Rosh Chodesh.

Next up, a bris on Erev Rosh Hashana.